Heroin Addict Takes Big Step in Recovery

Films / USA

About The Film

We’ve had the opportunity to do a lot of work with Union Rescue Mission over the years.  As a result, we’ve met some incredibly brave individuals who have challenged and taught us a lot about the recovery process.  During one of our visits to URM, we were introduced to James. He was open to sharing his journey with us in hopes that it might be an encouragement to others who are dealing with the shame and guilt associated with addiction and that they may find healing.


We’re working to serve ministry leaders & pastors. Click to learn more.

[location: USA, length: 5:40]

A heroin addict discovers the importance of forgiveness and community.  [location: USA, length: 5:40]

We’ve had the opportunity to do a lot of work with Union Rescue Mission over the years.  As a result, we’ve met some incredibly brave individuals who have challenged and taught us a lot about the recovery process.  During one of our visits to URM, we were introduced to James. He was open to sharing his journey with us in hopes that it might be an encouragement to others who are dealing with the shame and guilt associated with addiction and that they may find healing.


We’re working to serve ministry leaders & pastors. Click to learn more.


Chaplain:
How long has it been since you’ve seen your family?

James:
Close to 10 years.

Chaplain:
10 years.

James:
Yeah.

Chaplain:
What’s been the hesitancy?

James:
Because I've messed up so many times before. They've heard me say sorry a thousand times.

URM Courtyard
James VO:
I’m originally from Korea. My family and I moved here when I was six years old. In my culture, the family name means a lot, There's expectations attached to it. I brought a lot of shame to my family, because I didn't uphold those expectations. I had a heroin addiction for over 20 years. The consequences are tremendous. I ended up alone on the street and I lost my family.

URM Cafeteria
Staff Prayer:
Pray it up. Father God, Thank you for waking us up this morning clean and sober in our right minds. Thank you for this food we are about to eat. Bless the hands that prepared it. In Jesus name. Amen

James VO:
I live here at the Union Rescue Mission, a place to recover your soul and transform your life. I've been here for the past year and a half of my life.

URM Balcony
James VO:
Having to trust in God was real tough. I came to the realization of having to surrender. That’s what he intended for me. Because of my pride and wanting to be in control, he had to humble me. You only feel is grace and love for you when you surrender to him.

URM Chapel
Chaplain:
This mission, this ministry exists to advance the Kingdom of God. We want to follow the Master. We want to be a part of the Kingdom. Forgiveness is a part of the redemption. Restoration is a part of the process. That's why we're here.

James VO:
Forgiveness is a word, to me, that was foreign in the sense that I had asked for forgiveness numerous times from my family, but, in all reality, I wasn't able to forgive myself for what I've done.

Chaplain:
Jesus is saying, "If you're going to be in the Kingdom, you need to come to terms with the work of forgiveness in your own heart. Don’t do any of this alone. Talk to somebody. Talk to somebody.

Chaplain McIntire's Office
James VO:
I'm realizing that community is necessary for recovery. We have to be in relationships. We have to answer the hard questions. That's how we grow.

Chaplain:
So, you’re brother sent you a friend request on facebook. Why has that been sitting in your inbox for a month and you haven’t responded?

James:
I’ve put off contacting and or trying to reconnect with my family because I always felt I needed to bring something to the table. I’m not held by those expectations anymore.

Chaplain:
Why are you ready now. What’s different about today?

James:
I feel like, you know, his friend request is telling me they’re ready to forgive, or I say they, He symbolizes my family right now.Tell them that I’m sure they’ve had a long trip but they’re home. And we’re glad they are home.

Chaplain:
and, you’re ready.

James:
I'm ready to make it happen, or let it happen.

Chap:
Amen.

James:
Amen.

Facebook Scene
James:
This is it. I can’t believe everyone’s so grown up now. Oh wow. There’s my dad. That’s my dad.

Chaplain:
How long has it been since you’ve seen a picture of your Dad?

James:
10 years.

Chaplain:
You don’t have a picture of him? You don’t keep pictures of your family?

James:
No. I’ve lost everything. And it was easier dealing with not having any reminders, you know. I wasted a lot of time. Too long.

URM Hallway
James:
I would like to make amends with all of them if possible. But with God I feel like everything is going to be alright, no matter what.

James' Dorm Room
James:
This whole past year and a half is like a whole new life. God has slowly been restoring me. I relied on heroin to make me feel numb or be the answer to everything. Now, I leave it to God. I'm just a lost child that's come to realize and to trust in God,that’s it.

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